ibneko: (Default)
[ Warning | Ramble-ly. Pretty technical. Probably boring. I'd skip if I were you. ]

So I finally got around to poking at the 1U HP DL320 G5 server (HP ProLiant DL320 G5 C352 3.20GHz Server, I think?) I picked up sometime back off the side of the street one night on the way home from broad games. It was marked "free" and "works", just missing hard drives and hard drive mounting rails.

I finally got around to booting it up. Threw in two 80GB SATA hard drives, replaced 2x 512MB chips of RAM with 2x 1GB, bringing the total up to a respectable 4 GB.

Surprisingly, everything works except for the DVD-RW drive, which is a tad bit of a pity. Rather, the drive works on boot, but it seems to die after sometime. Ended up downloading Ubuntu 12.04 and dumping it onto a USB stick.

Ran into an odd problem where it kept thinking it was supposed to read from /cdrom. Had to switch into the shell and manually mount /dev/sdc /cdrom, then exit. Rest of the installation went pretty smoothly, aside from learning about LVM and messing up my GRUB install the first time around.

Just finished installing openssh, apache, rvm (ruby-head, etc), mysqld, memcached (not sure why I decided to install that - I'm probably not likely to get around to using it, actually), node.js...

Today I learned about "apt-cache search ...". And how to copy and paste in vi. You'd think I'd know the latter, but I usually get away with using the MacOS X Terminal, where I usually have a pointing device to select text and do your normal copy and pasting.

I just wish it wasn't so damn loud. Stupid fans. Compared to my Mac Mini (that acts as my primary server and backup computer while my laptop gets repaired*), it sounds like a hurricane. Even when the fans aren't on full blast. :\ I dunno, maybe I could sell this for $600-800 and buy another Mac Mini. Although a friend has offered to host this in his basement, and that would work quite nicely, I guess.

I guess the next step is probably going to be to find some way to mask the majority of the sound without tossing it into a closet and causing it to overheat. :\ Failing that, maybe I'll take an early vacation out to Chicago to visit my friend and install the server at his place. XD


*Wifi/Bluetooth cable managed to break. I think a combination of heat and stress and casual use resulted in weakening the surface mount adaptor head or something. Either way, covered by AppleCare and is somewhere in the repair process.
ibneko: (Default)
[ Warning | Ramble-ly. Pretty technical. Probably boring. I'd skip if I were you. ]

So I finally got around to poking at the 1U HP DL320 G5 server (HP ProLiant DL320 G5 C352 3.20GHz Server, I think?) I picked up sometime back off the side of the street one night on the way home from broad games. It was marked "free" and "works", just missing hard drives and hard drive mounting rails.

I finally got around to booting it up. Threw in two 80GB SATA hard drives, replaced 2x 512MB chips of RAM with 2x 1GB, bringing the total up to a respectable 4 GB.

Surprisingly, everything works except for the DVD-RW drive, which is a tad bit of a pity. Rather, the drive works on boot, but it seems to die after sometime. Ended up downloading Ubuntu 12.04 and dumping it onto a USB stick.

Ran into an odd problem where it kept thinking it was supposed to read from /cdrom. Had to switch into the shell and manually mount /dev/sdc /cdrom, then exit. Rest of the installation went pretty smoothly, aside from learning about LVM and messing up my GRUB install the first time around.

Just finished installing openssh, apache, rvm (ruby-head, etc), mysqld, memcached (not sure why I decided to install that - I'm probably not likely to get around to using it, actually), node.js...

Today I learned about "apt-cache search ...". And how to copy and paste in vi. You'd think I'd know the latter, but I usually get away with using the MacOS X Terminal, where I usually have a pointing device to select text and do your normal copy and pasting.

I just wish it wasn't so damn loud. Stupid fans. Compared to my Mac Mini (that acts as my primary server and backup computer while my laptop gets repaired*), it sounds like a hurricane. Even when the fans aren't on full blast. :\ I dunno, maybe I could sell this for $600-800 and buy another Mac Mini. Although a friend has offered to host this in his basement, and that would work quite nicely, I guess.

I guess the next step is probably going to be to find some way to mask the majority of the sound without tossing it into a closet and causing it to overheat. :\ Failing that, maybe I'll take an early vacation out to Chicago to visit my friend and install the server at his place. XD


*Wifi/Bluetooth cable managed to break. I think a combination of heat and stress and casual use resulted in weakening the surface mount adaptor head or something. Either way, covered by AppleCare and is somewhere in the repair process.
ibneko: (Default)
http://news.com.com/JavaScript+opens+doors+to+browser-based+attacks/2100-7349_3-6099891.html?part=rss&tag=6099891&subj=news

Rather disturbing news, although I can think of ways of making it useful.. especially in tech support: connect to this page, and we'll retrieve details of your mucked up self-installation and tell you how to fix it. :D Or patch all your computers in your house. Although that might be a bit harder to do, since that actually requires running software on someone's computer. But I think that could be done...

Heh, yeah, it'd be a nice white-hat hack. Create a javascript, that, when loaded, will automatically cause all computers on the network to:
-Run antispyware (trendmicro online!)
-Run antivirus checking (...dunno)
-Install the latest windows updates (and firefox, mwahahaha)
-and uh... tell uses to tell their friends. :D

(yeeeah, I know it's probably near impossible, since it looks like the way their pinging other computers is via some odd method that wasn't meant to be used to ping.)
ibneko: (Default)
Authentication:
We'll generate a new challege string. This will be composed of:
- a random lifespan
- a random character
- and probably the mysql key for the row we're temporarily storing our randomness in.
We'll encode this in MD5 and send it to the client as the challenge.
Client encodes (password+challenge) with MD5 and sends this back to us.
We compare MD5(password+challenge) with what client replies with.
If they match, they're authenticated.

--
Did I get that right? I've been reading various articles and also looking at livejournal code. I'm pretty sure it's right, as... even if the MD5 hash gets intercepted by someone in the middle, they can't guess the password, since it'll be quite different each time: changing one letter in the string used to generate MD5 will result in a vastly different MD5 hash, if my memory isn't lying. And our challenge string will be different each time.
ibneko: (Default)
USB Missile Launcher - by way of The Register:
http://www.iwantoneofthose.com/search.do?productCode=mislau

::snickers:: so silly. I want one.

---
MoBB - Month of Browser Bugs, as announced by MD Moore, "the co-founder of the Metasploit Framework", releasing one new browser hack every day for the entire month of July. News via this article: http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1985027,00.asp?kc=ewnws070606dtx1k0000599

Blog here: http://browserfun.blogspot.com/

--
This is interesting: Hamachi - a zero-config VPN networking enabler. As in, it makes use of a third party mediator to get past firewalls, and from there on, data goes directly between the two machines...? (according to it's website, anyhow)

"Once you have computers hooked up via Hamachi, they will be tricked into thinking that they are on the same local area network (LAN). This leads to a number of wonderful things, some of which are obvious and some are not. "

Thus far, there's windows, linux, and MacOS X versions out.

Voice Post

Jul. 4th, 2006 05:08 pm
ibneko: (Default)


--
Okay, that was a test of the following:
- Voice Candy (http://www.potionfactory.com/voicecandy/), the rather nifty little thing that changes your voice.
- SoundFlower (http://www.cycling74.com/products/soundflower - site down, try http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/14067 ?), an extension that adds the functionality to reroute audio from one place to another. As in, instead of sending audio to your headphones, you can output it to the SoundFlower stream. And from there, any Core Audio app can pick the SoundFlower stream as an input.
- Gizmo (http://www.gizmoproject.com/), the VoIP (Voice over IP) app that, I'd say, rivals Skype in spiffy free offerings. More on this later.
- Gizmo based LiveJournal Voice Posting.

---
SoundFlower required a reboot to get it working. Still, I'm not going to complain, 'cause it's awesome. No preference panes or anything, just the devices in the Sound Preference Pane.

Voice Candy's spiffy, but... I don't know if I want to pay up yet. It's not something I'd use everyday. More like a toy to play with and toss out once I get bored.

Gizmo... 2.0.158. I had issues getting it to log in on my network. Then, when our cable connection died and I switched over to my neighbor's network, poof, it worked. WTF. It kept hanging at "Starting Agent..." -.- I don't get it. (needless to say, it's not... userfriendly in that respect. You need to be able to configure your local network. Or not. I don't know.)

Oh, yeah, another thing about Gizmo? Free area 775 numbers. Mine be: 775-599-2741. Probably not going to use it that often, but hey, it's nice to know it's there. There's also free conference rooms.. o.O Although... I don't know if it's permanent.
ibneko: (Default)
That 250GB Maxtor hard drive? I ended up getting it anyways. Yeah, yeah, I know Maxtor has problems, but I realized that:
a) the hard drives that failed on my dad were both Western Digital.
b) the external (firewire) Maxtor 80GB we got some time ago works perfectly thus far.

story thus far:
Dad wants the 250GB in his systems to use as backup. Plugged it in, Linux recognized it as 16907 cylinders, and this was the most it would recognize / limited us to that. Or rather, 137 GB max. We found that we could hack it to 30000 some cylinders = 250GB (fdisk, expert mode). But we were still getting drive out of space issues.

(Note to others:
If you're getting disk full issues while making things like directories, but you can make small files, this might be the problem.)

Eventually, we discovered that the problem was that the BIOS on that system was way too old. ^^;; And that in the BIOS, it only recognized up to 137.5 GB. ::facepalm:: an entire day wasted there...

Well, given that it's Linux, we decided not to try to hunt down a BIOS replacement. Maybe I'll have to go that route, who knows.

Anyhow, spotting the old 80GB Maxtor external firewire disk, I figured, hey, since the system's max is 137 GB, we can swap Maxtor drives! So I cracked open the external (it's old. There's no warrantee left on it, unless Maxtor offers 10 year/lifetime warrantees. I doubt it.) and swapped in the 250GB. It mounted, sure, but it shows up as 128GB. >.<

I'm pretty sure it's the firewire bridge/chip (for the curious: SYM13FW500, LMI Symbios, 2000 P/N 710-008, 1394-ATA Bridge, Rev A). There's a few jumpers on the board, but they don't seem to do anything. At least nothing immediately apparent.

Yep, it's the firewire bridge limit. My 200GB Seagate drive mounts as 128GB. Annoyingly enough, drives need to be in Master mode (not cable select or slave) in order for them to work. Poop. This means the 80 GB drive goes back in. And uh... I dunno... Looks like I need another enclosure. :: annoyed::

------------
[Append]
I was wrong. Completely and utterly wrong.

The problem, I believe now, is due to the Linux Kernel my dad's using. It's 2.4.2-2. For drive 137+GB support, he'll need to run at least 2.4.19/2.5--something.

Well, there goes another 2 hours. But eh, knowledge gained. Price's kinda steep, but eh, oh well.
ibneko: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] despiojarse12 mentioned that not only was his computer locked with a BIOS password, but also a HDD Password. Not really haven't heard of hard drive passwords, I went hunting, and here are the results~

(Although, before that, here's stuff on BIOS Password resetting:
http://www.tech-faq.com/reset-bios-password.shtml
http://www.elfqrin.com/docs/biospw.html)

http://www.forensicfocus.com/index.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=15&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0
http://ask.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=03/12/09/2054235
http://www.rockbox.org/lock.html
https://forum.hackinthebox.org/viewtopic.php?p=83468

Technical background:
The ATA Password is part of the ATA-3 specs, designed, and usually enabled on laptops to prevent drive use once the drive is stolen. There are two passwords, one master, one user. Passwords are _not_ stored in the BIOS, so resetting the BIOS will not help you. May do more harm than help? I don't know. The passwords are stored in the drive firmware and failure to enter the password will result in all reads and writes being denied. There is also usually a certain amount of time you can try the password before the drive will lock up, and refuse further attempts until it is powercycled (eh, turned off, then turned back on.)

Information found:
--> May be possible to stick the ATA drive in an IDE USB enclosure. That _may_ bypass the password requirement? One reported success...
--> May be possible, but less likely, to swap the controllers...would require a similar disk drive though.
--> A clean room recovery by moving the actual disk platters to another drive may work.
--> Recovery is possible with professional services, although costly.
--> There are recovery tools online, for a fee. Usually, they're remote services (You install a program, program calls home, and stuff is repaired from there)
--> There are some programs out there to alter settings. Names I've seen include:
-----ATA Password Tool 1.1 (Included in the Ultimate Boot CD: PC repair boot CD)
-----atapwd
--> Formatting the drive may not do you any good; the passwords are apparently stored in firmware, and not on the actual drive...?
--> There's some tool by some company in the UK that'll do something about the password. Vogon was the company name, I believe.
ibneko: (Default)
Apparently it _is_ possible to share the internet over the same ethernet cable. So my iBook is currently functioning as both the gateway to the modem (providing internet to a pc), and as a computer itself, retaining internet abilities~

Come to think of it, of course it would work. There'd be no need to have two separate physical interfaces.

Why? Insight went and did a network upgrade of some sort. Which caused all netgear routers to fail when grabbing an IP from the network. So my netgear router is currently useless.

Now, the question is, can I share internet with my PC as well? Over one physical wire, mind. And turn that into a router?

--
Append:
The setup goes as follows:
Modem => normal hub port => normal hub ports to { iBook, PC }
I kept the PC disconnected while I grabbed an IP address on my iBook, then enabled sharing, and plugged the PC back in. And it all worked~ =^.^=

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